Friday, February 22, 2013

Wednesday, February 20, 2013

Feeling Blue? Then Try Argentine Tango...

kind of illusion

Feeling blue? Then try the tango: Scientists claim the dance helps rid depression, anxiety and stress
Australian academics said the dance has significant health benefits
University of New England team recruited 41 people with complaints of stress, anxiety and depression
Study found 'satisfaction with life and self-efficacy significantly increased'


Thanks go to Nina P on Facebook for the find....!!!

UNE/Rose Pinniger Blog Article: http://blog.une.edu.au/news/2008/04/16/tango-trial-aims-to-dance-depression-away/

Apparently there are a couple of published studies (at least) - one in the journal "Music and Movement" and one in "The American Journal of Dance Therapy"...one on depression and anxiety and one on macular degeneration...I'll see what I can do to get the full text of the study...

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2280869/Feeling-blue-Then-try-tango-Scientists-claim-dance-helps-rid-depression-anxiety-stress.html#ixzz2LUWqSqyG

The authors wrote: ‘Participants showed significant reductions in depression, anxiety, stress, and insomnia. Satisfaction with life and self-efficacy were significantly increased.‘At one-month follow-up, depression, anxiety, and stress levels remained reduced. A brief programme of tango dance was shown to be an effective strategy in alleviating mood disorders.’ The team at the University of New England in New South Wales and Australian National University in Canberra recruited 41 people with complaints of stress, anxiety and depression.

Mood: The team at the University of New England in New South Wales and Australian National University in Canberra recruited 41 people with complaints of stress, anxiety and depression. The participants were aged from 18 to 73, mainly well-educated and 80 per cent were female. Clinical assessments were made to classify their symptoms as extremely severe, severe, moderate, mild or normal.

Twenty participants then took eight tango sessions of 90 minutes each over a two-week period, while the 21 in the control group were put on a waiting list for classes. The assessments were conducted again at the end of the two weeks. Most tango participants showed clinically significant improvement in at least one area, whereas those on a waiting list were stable or became worse. Dancers also reported less insomnia and better general life satisfaction. One month later all 41 people were asked to complete the survey again and the results showed the tango’s benefits in reducing anxiety, stress and depression still remained.

The benefits for insomnia and general life satisfaction did not, however, suggest longer courses might be needed for sustained effects in these areas. The authors said tango requires 'a strong connection' with a partner, synchronisation and improvisation. They said study feedback 'indicated that this activity helped the participants to focus on the present moment and mentally switch off from their feelings of stress and distress'.

Another recent study, also by Australia’s University of New England and published in the British Journal of Visual Impairment, found that dancing the tango reduced depression, boosted self-esteem and improved balance in people with age-related macular degeneration.


Abstract here...

Intensive Tango Dance Program for People With Self-Referred Affective Symptoms
Rosa Pinniger, BPsych1⇓
Einar B. Thorsteinsson, PhD1
Rhonda F. Brown, PhD2
Patricia McKinley, PhD3
1School of Behavioural, Cognitive and Social Sciences, University of New England, Armidale, New South Wales, Australia
2Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
3McGill University, Montreal, Canada
Rosa Pinniger, School of Behavioural, Cognitive and Social Sciences, University of New England, Armidale, New South Wales 2351, Australia. Email: rosapinniger@gmail.com

Abstract

Recent research shows that tango dance may be an effective strategy for influencing symptoms that contribute to mood disorders. In this study, we examined the efficacy of a short-duration intensive tango program (ie, 2 weeks). Forty-one participants were randomized to tango dance (1½ hours, 4 times/week for 2 weeks) or to a wait-list control condition. Self-rated symptoms of depression, anxiety, stress, insomnia, self-efficacy, satisfaction with life and mindfulness were assessed at pretest, posttest, and 1 month later. Tango group participants showed significant reductions in depression, anxiety, stress, and insomnia at posttest relative to the controls, whereas satisfaction with life and self-efficacy were significantly increased. At 1-month follow-up, depression, anxiety, and stress levels remained reduced relative to the wait-list controls. Thus, this brief but intensive program of tango dance was shown to be an effective strategy in alleviating mood disorders in people who self-report these symptoms.
anxiety dance depression insomnia mindfulness



Intensive Tango Dance Program for People With Self-Referred Affective Symptoms
Authors
Rosa Pinniger, Einar B Thorsteinsson, Rhonda F Brown, Patricia McKinley
Publication date
2013
Journal name
Music and Medicine
Volume
5
Issue
1
Pages
15-22
Publisher
SAGE Publications
Description
Abstract Recent research shows that tango dance may be an effective strategy for
influencing symptoms that contribute to mood disorders. In this study, we examined the
efficacy of a short-duration intensive tango program (ie, 2 weeks). Forty-one participants
were randomized to tango dance (1½ hours, 4 times/week for 2 weeks) or to a wait-list
control condition. Self-rated symptoms of depression, anxiety, stress, insomnia, self-efficacy,
satisfaction with life and mindfulness were assessed at pretest, posttest, and 1 month later. ...
Scholar articles
Intensive Tango Dance Program for People With Self-Referred Affective Symptoms
R Pinniger, EB Thorsteinsson, RF Brown, P McKinley - Music and Medicine, 2013




Tango program for individuals with age-related macular degeneration
Authors
Rosa Pinniger, Rhonda F. Brown, Einar Baldvin Thorsteinsson, Patricia McKinley
Publication date
2013/1/25
Journal name
British Journal of Visual Impairment
Volume
31
Issue
1
Pages
47-59
Publisher
SAGE
Description
Abstract Recent research shows that tango dance is an absorbing and effective strategy to
reduce levels of depression, while also increasing well-being. This study investigates the
feasibility, acceptability, and adherence to a tango programme for individuals with age-
related macular degeneration (ARMD). Depression is closely intertwined with the ARMD
diagnosis, since the loss of central vision has a profoundly negative impact on the person's
quality of life. Seventeen participants were randomised to tango dance (1.5 h, 2 times/ ...
Scholar articles
Tango programme for individuals with age-related macular degeneration
R Pinniger, RF Brown, EB Thorsteinsson, P McKinley - British Journal of Visual Impairment, 2013





Argentine tango dance compared to mindfulness meditation and a waiting-list control: A randomised trial for treating depression
Authors
Rosa Pinniger, Rhonda F Brown, Einar B Thorsteinsson, Patricia McKinley
Publication date
2012/8/3
Journal name
Complementary Therapies in Medicine
Publisher
Churchill Livingstone
Description
To determine whether tango dancing is as effective as mindfulness meditation in reducing
symptoms of psychological stress, anxiety and depression, and in promot.
Scholar articles
Argentine tango dance compared to mindfulness meditation and a waiting-list control: A randomised trial for treating depression
R Pinniger, RF Brown, EB Thorsteinsson, P McKinley - Complementary Therapies in Medicine, 2012

Monday, February 18, 2013

File under SuperHeroPowers

The ability to spontaneously generate F5 tornadoes and control their path.

There's some shit that needs to be erased from the face of my Mother Earth.

Sent from my iPhone, Luckenbach, Texas